Irish Stout

The most common thing I hear when I offer someone a stout is, “I don’t like dark beers…” I think this is mostly because there is only one dark beer the average American has ever tried—and this is usually with Corned Beef and Cabbage on St. Patricks day en route to a hangover—is Guiness Stout.

The Irish Stout style (2015 BJCP Style 15B) is defined as:

A black beer with a pronounced roasted flavor, often similar to coffee. The balance can range from fairly even to quite bitter, with the more balanced versions having a little malty sweetness and the bitter versions being quite dry. Draught versions typically are creamy from a nitro pour, but bottled versions will not have this dispense- derived character. The roasted flavor can be dry and coffee-like to somewhat chocolaty.

This style has a wide range of flavors; “even to bitter”, “malty sweetness to bitter versions being quite dry”, and “dray and coffee-like to somewhat chocolaty”

This version is one that is balanced and not excessively dry recipe. The mash consist of:

7.25# Pale 2-Row
1.75# Flaked Barley
0.40# Carapils/Dextrine

Which was mashed at 154F for 60 minutes. When it was towards the end, I added the dark malts before a recirculation mash to clear up the wort. During this vorlof stage, I added

0.75# Crystal 80
0.75# Roasted Barley
0.40# Debittered Black Malt.

and recirculated for 15 minutes. I then batch sparged in two sessions of 168F water.

I boiled for 60 minutes and added

38g Challenger Hops @ 60
1 tablet Whirlflock @ 5
1 tsp Yeast Nutrient @ 5

At the end of the boil, I cooled using an infusion chiller (the plate chiller is just too much of a pain to clean) and pitched a 2L Starter of

Wyeast 1028 London Ale Yeast

and fermented @ 64 for 3 weeks. Afterwards, I transferred to a keg, crashed it, carbed it, and drank it.

It was perhaps the most smooth stout I’ve made. I would really love to try this one on nitrogen.